Commonwealth agencies finding it hard to go green

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We must commend the Canberra Times for a very interesting article recently that found energy bills in Parliament House and some Commonwealth agencies have increased despite Government pledges to take the lead in reducing its own carbon footprint.

Emma Macdonald’s article “Government is finding it hard to turn green” on 10 September 2011 investigated the power bills of Parliament House and several Commonwealth agencies. She found that last year Parliament House’s electricity bill reached $3.2 million, up from $2.5 million the year before and the third successive yearly increase.

Since the Labor Government has been in office, the Defence Department’s energy use has decreased nearly 18 per cent, but energy use across the rest of government has increased by almost 6 per cent.

Apparently, an ANAO report in 2009 found that 72 per cent of Commonwealth agencies were failing to meet tenant light and power reduction targets and 59 per cent were failing to meet office central service power reduction targets. The report calculated that taxpayers could be saved $75 million per year if the Government made even simple changes to environmental practices.

According to the Canberra Times article:

Worst performers (power bills rising)

  • Department of Parliamentary Services – $3,191,000 last year up from $2,488,000 in 2009
  • Australian Taxation Office – $9,333,602 last year up from $9,194,515 in 2009
  • Department of Sustainability and Environment, Water, Population and Communities – $757,582 last year up from $733,657 in 2009

Best performers (power bills falling)

  • Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade – $1,982,941 last year down from $2,205,089 in 2009
  • National Library – $859,976 last year down from $1,029,802 in 2009
  • National Gallery of Australia – $1,295,747 last year down from $1,418,471 in 2009
 

Commonwealth agencies finding it hard to go green

 

We must commend the Canberra Times for a very interesting article recently that found energy bills in Parliament House and some Commonwealth agencies have increased despite Government pledges to take the lead in reducing its own carbon footprint.

 

Emma Macdonald’s article “Government is finding it hard to turn green” on 10 September 2011 investigated the power bills of Parliament House and several Commonwealth agencies. She found that last year Parliament House’s electricity bill reached $3.2 million, up from $2.5 million the year before and the third successive yearly increase.

 

Since the Labor Government has been in office, the Defence Department’s energy use has decreased nearly 18 per cent, but energy use across the rest of government has increased by almost 6 per cent.

 

Apparently, an ANAO report in 2009 found that 72 per cent of Commonwealth agencies were failing to meet tenant light and power reduction targets and 59 per cent were failing to meet office central service power reduction targets. The report calculated that taxpayers could be saved $75 million per year if the Government made even simple changes to environmental practices.

 

According to the Canberra Times article:

 

Worst performers (power bills rising)

· Department of Parliamentary Services – $3,191,000 last year up from $2,488,000 in 2009

· Australian Taxation Office – $9,333,602 last year up from $9,194,515 in 2009

· Department of Sustainability and Environment, Water, Population and Communities – $757,582 last year up from $733,657 in 2009

 

Best performers (power bills falling)

· Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade – $1,982,941 last year down from $2,205,089 in 2009

· National Library – $859,976 last year down from $1,029,802 in 2009

Commonwealth agencies finding it hard to go green

 

We must commend the Canberra Times for a very interesting article recently that found energy bills in Parliament House and some Commonwealth agencies have increased despite Government pledges to take the lead in reducing its own carbon footprint.

 

Emma Macdonald’s article “Government is finding it hard to turn green” on 10 September 2011 investigated the power bills of Parliament House and several Commonwealth agencies. She found that last year Parliament House’s electricity bill reached $3.2 million, up from $2.5 million the year before and the third successive yearly increase.

 

Since the Labor Government has been in office, the Defence Department’s energy use has decreased nearly 18 per cent, but energy use across the rest of government has increased by almost 6 per cent.

 

Apparently, an ANAO report in 2009 found that 72 per cent of Commonwealth agencies were failing to meet tenant light and power reduction targets and 59 per cent were failing to meet office central service power reduction targets. The report calculated that taxpayers could be saved $75 million per year if the Government made even simple changes to environmental practices.

 

According to the Canberra Times article:

 

Worst performers (power bills rising)

· Department of Parliamentary Services – $3,191,000 last year up from $2,488,000 in 2009

· Australian Taxation Office – $9,333,602 last year up from $9,194,515 in 2009

· Department of Sustainability and Environment, Water, Population and Communities – $757,582 last year up from $733,657 in 2009

 

Best performers (power bills falling)

· Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade – $1,982,941 last year down from $2,205,089 in 2009

· National Library – $859,976 last year down from $1,029,802 in 2009

· National Gallery of Australia – $1,295,747 last year down from $1,418,471 in 2009

Commonwealth agencies finding it hard to go green

 

We must commend the Canberra Times for a very interesting article recently that found energy bills in Parliament House and some Commonwealth agencies have increased despite Government pledges to take the lead in reducing its own carbon footprint.

 

Emma Macdonald’s article “Government is finding it hard to turn green” on 10 September 2011 investigated the power bills of Parliament House and several Commonwealth agencies. She found that last year Parliament House’s electricity bill reached $3.2 million, up from $2.5 million the year before and the third successive yearly increase.

 

Since the Labor Government has been in office, the Defence Department’s energy use has decreased nearly 18 per cent, but energy use across the rest of government has increased by almost 6 per cent.

 

Apparently, an ANAO report in 2009 found that 72 per cent of Commonwealth agencies were failing to meet tenant light and power reduction targets and 59 per cent were failing to meet office central service power reduction targets. The report calculated that taxpayers could be saved $75 million per year if the Government made even simple changes to environmental practices.

 

According to the Canberra Times article:

 

Worst performers (power bills rising)

  • Department of Parliamentary Services – $3,191,000 last year up from $2,488,000 in 2009
  • Australian Taxation Office – $9,333,602 last year up from $9,194,515 in 2009
  • Department of Sustainability and Environment, Water, Population and Communities – $757,582 last year up from $733,657 in 2009

 

Best performers (power bills falling)

  • Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade – $1,982,941 last year down from $2,205,089 in 2009
  • National Library – $859,976 last year down from $1,029,802 in 2009
  • National Gallery of Australia – $1,295,747 last year down from $1,418,471 in 2009

· National Gallery of Australia – $1,295,747 last year down from $1,418,471 in 2009

 

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